Julian Haber

Dr. Jullian Haber is the author of multiple books including They Were Soldiers in Peace and War, Volumes one and two which profile Jewish War Veterans from Texas. His research on WWI veterans from Fort Worth, Texas will be soon published as The Yanks Are Coming, Over There, Over There.

Over There: Edwin Schwarz

When a Jenny or D.H. 9 fell from the sky and thundered into the ground, routine activities immediately ceased and the total emphasis of the medical group turned to the rescue and recovery of the involved airmen.  Interrupting his other duties, Edwin rode out to accident sites in an ambulance, across bumpy, hole-ridden, rough roads and fields, kicking up massive clouds of choking light brown dust.

Over There: Abie Fox

Abie Fox, a Polish émigré and Fort Worth, Texas, coffee shop owner, entered the U.S. Navy in April 1917 and he immediately shipped out for training at the Great Lakes Naval Air Station.  He eventually joined the USS Texas as a Fireman Second Class on June 28, 1917.

Over There: James J. Joffe

In mid-January 1918, Lt. Joffe flew his Airco de Havilland twin seat bomber at several hundred feet altitude. The aircraft suddenly became uncontrollable and spun toward the earth nose first at full speed.  He pulled back his control stick with all his strength and hit his pedals attempting to stabilize the plane to no avail.

Over There: Joseph Linett

Joseph Linett left Ukraine for the United States. He was inducted into the Medical Corps and served in France as doctor. While overseas, he tragically lost his wife back home.

Over There: David Carb

Fort Worth’s David Carb (1885-1952), a Harvard graduate, poet, and playwright, was among the idealists who romanticized the Great War. In June 1915, two years before America entered the conflict, he was among the dozens of literati to join the American Red Cross Ambulance Service.

Over There: Sam Raiz

Heavy rains and strong winds whipped across the American trenches lining a hill near the French town of Saint-Mihiel on a mid-September morning in 1918. Sam Raiz fixed his bayonet to his rifle. Along with other members of A Company of the 360th Regiment of the 90th Division Texas Brigade, he began a march towards the heavily fortified German lines.